News

Emotet Raised from the Dead

Widely regarded as one of the most dangerous botnets in recent history Emotet activity stopped in May 2019. Researchers noticed that Emotet activity started picking up again in August. In less than a month, researchers have detected a new spam email campaign been distributed by the botnet. Malicious emails have been sent from the Emotet botnet have been seen spotted targeting those residing in Germany, the United Kingdom, Poland, and Italy. Further, emails have been seen sent to US individuals, businesses, and government organizations. By June 2019 all activity on Emotet servers had ceased. On August 22, 2019, the command and control servers starting receiving requests and acting upon those requests. Researchers noticed that those behind the botnet have been actively preparing for a new spam email campaign. This preparation involved cleaning it of fake bots, putting together new campaigns, and establishing th...

Business Email Compromise Scams Raked in $26 Billion

In a recent public service announcement release...

New Cyber Espionage Malware Emerges

Researchers have discovered a new piece of malw...

14 iOS Vulnerabilities Found

Last week the InfoSec community was informed ab...

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Bing.com Redirect

Bing.com is a legitimate Internet search engine. This site is developed by a legitimate company and is not related to any virus or malware. Be ...

Search.yahoo.com Redirect

Search.yahoo.com is a popular website that can be used as the browser homepage or default Internet search engine. Recently, there is a rise in ...

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New Removal Guides

StuardRitchi Ransomware

StuardRitchi is a ransomware, belonging to the GlobeImposter ransomware family. It is designed to encrypt files and keep them on lock-down, until a ransom is paid (decryption software/tool is bought). StuardRitchi changes afflicted file extensions into ".crypt", which would make "1.jpg" appear as "1.jpg.crypt" and so on. It drops an html file, titled "how_to_back_files.html" on victim's desktop, which contains the ransom demanding message. This malicious piece of software was discovered by dnwls0719. The ransom note states, that to recover their encrypted files, users need to purchase a decryptor. To buy the decryption software/tool victims are told to contact the cyber criminal via email addresses provided. The message further tells the price of (ransom demanded for) the offered decryptor to be 2,500 US dollars in Bitcoin cryptocurrency. Cryptocurrency, pre-paid vouchers and other digital currencies are d...

encryptedRSA Ransomware

encryptedRSA is the name of a software that...

WSH RAT Malware

WSH is the name of a remote access/administ...

Apple ID Scam (Mac)

There are many d...

Top Antispyware

SpyHunter 5

Overview: Simply put a rootkit is a program or, more often, a collection of software tools that gives the hacker remote access to and control ov...

Malwarebytes Anti-Malware

Malwarebytes Anti-malware Pro costs $24.95 for a lifetime license and includes additional features not available in the free version, such as rea...

Top Antivirus

Combo Cleaner: Antivirus and System Optimizer (for Mac computers)

  Supported platforms: At time of testing, Combo Cleaner was only available for Mac computers running the Mac OSX 10.10 (Yosemite), Mac ...

Avast Internet Security

Cost Many antivirus producers are wondering what it takes to make a successful paid for suite. What needs to be included to justify the price ta...

Malware activity

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Medium threat activity
Medium

Increased attack rate of infections detected within the last 24 hours.

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